Category: Honorable Mentions

Honorable Mentions: It Is Good, May 12, 2019

Honorable Mentions: It Is Good, May 12, 2019

What are Honorable Mentions?  They are the quotes, book references, videos, etc that may have been brought up during Sunday’s sermon and are posted here in case somebody would like to check them out.  Please remember that all references occurred within the context of the sermon.  Sermon delivered by Pastor Bryan Hackett. 

Bible References:  Genesis 1:1-31; Revelation 21:1-15; Psalm 92:1-4

Concepts: 

Lectio Divina:  This is just a Latin term for an old monastic way of reading sacred literature.  Richard Rohr describes it this way:  With the first reading, listen with your heart’s ear for a phrase or word that stands out for you. During the second reading, reflect on what touches you, perhaps speaking that response aloud or writing in a journal. Third, respond with a prayer or expression of what you have experienced and what it calls you to. Fourth, rest in silence after the reading. 

Enuma Elish:  The Babylonian creation myth.

Imago Dei:  People in the image of god. Reflecting the beauty of creation back to him.

 

Honorable Mentions: Hope Springs Eternal, May 5, 2019

Honorable Mentions: Hope Springs Eternal, May 5, 2019

What are Honorable Mentions?  They are the quotes, book references, videos, etc that may have been brought up during Sunday’s sermon and are posted here in case somebody would like to check them out.  Please remember that all references occurred within the context of the sermon.  Sermon delivered by Pastor Bryan Hackett. 

Books: Searching for Sunday—loving, leaving, and finding the church, by Rachel Held Evans.

Epilogue:  We have come to the final chapter, and I write it, appropriately enough, just before dawn on a Sunday morning. The house is quiet and the windows are dark. Dan snores in the room across the hall while I patter away at the keyboard, one last all-nighter before I finally send this book to the publisher. There’s this mockingbird that’s been singing from about midnight to three in the morning like she’s got the New York Philharmonic behind her, and I can’t for the life of me figure out what’s up with her, if singing loud into the night while the rest of the world roosts means she knows something important about the darkness that the rest of us don’t. I wonder what she sees. 

But even the mockingbird has grown silent at this dark, heavy hour when the night stretches out like an inky ocean and it’s heard to remember the colors of day. I find myself wondering if every generation of Christians has felt itself at the edge of this precipice, waiting for resurrection and worrying it might not come. Perhaps every pilgrim in search of church has wondered if it’s a lifetime of feeling his way through the dark, longing for light.

But if I’ve learned anything in this journey, both in writing this book and clumsily living its content, it’s that Sunday morning sneaks up on us—like dawn, like resurrection, like the sun that rises a ribbon at a time. We expect a trumpet and a triumphant entry, but as always, God surprises us by showing up in ordinary things; in bread, in wine, in water, in words, in sickness, in healing, in death, in a manger of hay, in a mother’s womb, in an empty tomb. Church isn’t some community you join or some place you arrive. Church is what happens when someone taps you on the shoulder and whispers in your ear, Pay attention, this is holy ground; God is here.

Even here, in the dark, God is busy making all things new.

So show up. Open every door. At the risk of looking like a fool buried with his feet facing the East or like a mockingbird singing stubbornly at the night, anticipate resurrection. It’s either just around the bend or a million miles away. Or perhaps it’s somewhere in between. Let’s find out together.

The Orthodox Heretic, by Peter Rollins:

Parables subvert this desire to make faith simple and understandable. They do not offer the reader clarity, for they refuse to be captured in the net of a single interpretation and instead demand our eternal return to their words, our wrestling with them, and our puzzling over them. (page 19, “Turning the Other Cheek”).

Quotes:

Holding to the Great Form, from Tao Te Ching

Holding to the Great Form

 All pass away.

They pass away unharmed, resting in Great Peace,

It is for food and music that the passing traveler stops.

When the Tao appears from its opening

It is so subtle, it has no taste.

Look at it, you cannot see it.

Listen, you cannot hear it.

Use it

You cannot exhaust it.

 

Honorable Mentions: Ascension, April 28, 2019

Honorable Mentions: Ascension, April 28, 2019

What are Honorable Mentions?  They are the quotes, book references, videos, etc that may have been brought up during Sunday’s sermon and are posted here in case somebody would like to check them out.  Please remember that all references occurred within the context of the sermon.  Sermon delivered by Pastor Bryan Hackett. 

Bible References:  John 16:7; John 16:12; John 20:17; Acts 1: Ephesians 4:8

Quotes:  Labeling a mystery may give the illusion of understanding it. Naming a problem does help us focus our attention, but labeling a problem only identifies the problem and does not increase our understanding in any way.”–Unable to verify origin of this quote.

Definitions:  Tao, This term, which was variously used by other Chinese philosophers, has special meaning within the context of Taoism, where it implies the essential, unnamable process of the universe.

Honorable Mentions, Easter 2019

Honorable Mentions, Easter 2019

What are Honorable Mentions?  They are the quotes, book references, videos, etc that may have been brought up during Sunday’s sermon and are posted here in case somebody would like to check them out.  Please remember that all references occurred within the context of the sermon.  Sermon delivered by Pastor Bryan Hackett. 

Bible References:  John 20:15-18

Quotes:  “fall through fear into love”–Cynthia Borgeault

“It is ultimately love that believes the resurrection.”–N.T.Wright

N.T. Wright recounts this story:  You probably do not remember the name Nikolai Ivanovich Bukharin. Many years ago, he was one of the most powerful men on earth. A Russian Communist leader, he took part in the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. He was the editor of the Soviet newspaper Pravda and was a full member of the Politburo. His works on economics and political science are still read today.

“The communist lecturer paused before summing up. His large audience listened fearfully. ‘Therefore,’ he said, ‘there is no God; Jesus Christ never existed; there is no such thing as a Holy Spirit. The Church is an oppressive institution, and anyway it’s out of date. The future belongs to the State; and the State is in the hands of the [Communist] Party’.

“He was about to sit down when an old priest near the front stood up. ‘May I say two words?’ he asked. (It’s three in English, but he was of course speaking Russian). The lecturer, disdainfully, gave him permission. He turned, looked over the crowd, and shouted: ‘Christ is risen!’ Back came the roar of the people: ‘He is risen indeed!’ They had been saying it every Easter for a thousand years; why should they stop now?

“They weren’t just whistling in the dark. The gospel message of Easter is the complete answer to tyranny”

Honorable Mentions: Ebenezer and Mary, April 14, 2019

Honorable Mentions: Ebenezer and Mary, April 14, 2019

What are Honorable Mentions?  They are the quotes, book references, videos, etc that may have been brought up during Sunday’s sermon and are posted here in case somebody would like to check them out.  Please remember that all references occurred within the context of the sermon.  Sermon delivered by Pastor Bryan Hackett. 

Bible References:  Moses and the Burning Bush, Exodus 3; Samuel and Ebenezer, 1 Samuel 7:12; Mary Magdelene Luke 8:2-3; Mark 16:9-12; Mark 15:10; Matthew 27:56; John 19:25; Luke 23:49

Quotes:  

I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me. –Isaac Newton

In this universe, there is one great energy, and we have no name for it.–Alan Watts, Zen Buddhist

The Tao which can be defined is not the real Tao–The Tao Te Ching

Beauty is truth, truth beauty, —that is all ye know on earth, and all ye need to know – Keats, from the poem “Ode to a Grecian Urn”

The original signification of the sacred stone is well illustrated by the account of the one at Beth-el (Gen. xxviii.). Jacob slept with a stone for a pillow and dreamed that the Lord addressed him. When he awoke he said, “Surely the Lord is in this place; and I knew it not”; then he anointed the stone, or, in other words, rendered an offering to it. This belief in a maẓẓebah, or in a stone, as the habitation of a deity is spread throughout the world, and even the designation “Beth-el.” was adopted among the Greeks and Romans, under the forms βαιτύλιον and “bætulus,” to denote a stone of this character. –From The Jewish Encyclopedia, 1906, which goes on to say that even the worship of sacred stones was widespread among Semitic people.

Other References:  Link to the blog post by Cynthia Borgeault of April 12, 2019 https://cac.org/dying-and-rising-2019-04-12/

Christ means Anointed, by Cynthia Borgeault

[Mary Magdalene’s anointing of Jesus] provides a powerful ritual access point to Christianity’s own deepest transformative wisdom. To begin with, it makes it virtually impossible to experience the Paschal Mystery in any other way than as an act of redemptive love. When Mary Magdalene is returned to her traditional role as the anointer of Jesus, a very important symmetry is also restored. We see that Jesus’s passage through death is framed on either side by her parallel acts of anointing. At Bethany she sends him forth to the cross wearing the unction of her love. And on Easter morning he awakens to that same fragrance of love as she arrives at the tomb with her spices and perfumes, expecting to anoint his body for death. He has been held in love throughout his entire passage.

As Bruce Chilton succinctly summarizes: “She connects his death and Resurrection.” [1] And she accomplishes this precisely by bracketing the entire experience in the parallel rituals of anointing. In so doing, Chilton adds, “Mary Magdalene established the place of anointing as the central ritual in Christianity, recollecting Jesus’s death and pointing forward to his resurrection.”

But what is it that she is actually pointing forward to? What is this Paschal journey from a wisdom standpoint? In the common understanding, Christianity has tended to view the resurrection as Jesus’s triumph over physical death. But for Christians in the wisdom tradition (who include among their ranks the very earliest witnesses to the resurrection) its meaning lies in something far deeper than merely the resuscitation of a corpse. Jesus’s real purpose in this sacrifice was to wager his own life against his core conviction that love is stronger than death, and that the laying down of self which is the essence of this love leads not to death, but to life…Thus, the real domain of the Paschal Mystery is not dying but dying-to-self. It serves as the archetype for all of our personal experiences of dying and rising to new life along the pathway of kenotic transformation, reminding us that it is not only possible but imperative to fall through fear into love because that is the only way we will ever truly know what it means to be alive.

Within the context of the resurrection, then, anointing becomes the ritual most closely associated with the passage from death of self to fullness of life, from egoic alienation to “union on a higher plane.” As such, it conveys the very essence of Christianity’s transformative wisdom.

Honorable Mentions: Dreaming woodsEnd, April 7, 2019

Honorable Mentions: Dreaming woodsEnd, April 7, 2019

What are Honorable Mentions?  They are the quotes, book references, videos, etc that may have been brought up during Sunday’s sermon and are posted here in case somebody would like to check them out.  Please remember that all references occurred within the context of the sermon.  Sermon delivered by Pastor Bryan Hackett.   

Bible References:  Genesis 28:10-22; John 1:49-51; I Corinthians 10:1-4

Pop Culture References: Star Trek the Next Generation, Guinan, as played by Whoopi Goldberg (shout out to Ben and Michelle, we miss you guys!)

Blog Post Referenced:  https://www.patheos.com/blogs/formerlyfundie/5-areas-where-progressive-christian-culture-completely-loses-me/?utm_content=buffer462c3&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=FBCP-PRX&fbclid=IwAR1I3Xk7O8Z_vRhq1MjZg2_11K4CzIKx6fM6wk2pPqZHM0rf7MunMW-A2aU

Honorable Mentions: It Is Enough, March 24, 2019

Honorable Mentions: It Is Enough, March 24, 2019

What are Honorable Mentions?  They are the quotes, book references, videos, etc that may have been brought up during Sunday’s sermon and are posted here in case somebody would like to check them out.  Please remember that all references occurred within the context of the sermon.  Sermon delivered by Pastor Bryan Hackett.   

Bible References: 1 Corinthians 12; Romans 8; 1 Corinthians 6:7; 2 Corinthians 12:9

Honorable Mentions: Rest in the Slow Work, March 17, 2019

Honorable Mentions: Rest in the Slow Work, March 17, 2019

What are Honorable Mentions?  They are the quotes, book references, videos, etc that may have been brought up during Sunday’s sermon and are posted here in case somebody would like to check them out.  Please remember that all references occurred within the context of the sermon.  Sermon delivered by Pastor Bryan Hackett.   

Bible References:

Luke 23:32-38; 1 Corinthians 13; Luke 10:38-42; Matthew 6:25-34

Quotes:

Don’t let your heart be hardened – don’t let your love grow cold

May it always stay so childlike – may it never grow too old

Don’t let your heart be hardened – may you always know the cure

Keep it broken before Jesus, keep it thankful, meek, and pure – Song by Petra  

A nation that continues year after year to spend more money on military defense than on programs of social uplift is approaching spiritual doom. – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

New survey results show Americans’ anxiety levels experienced a sharp increase in the past year, with almost 40 percent of respondents saying they felt more anxious than they did a year ago.  This poll shows US adults are increasingly anxious particularly about health, safety, and finances…” – May 2018 APA study

Books: The Langoliers, by Stephen King

Honorable Mentions: Right Relationship with Reality, March 2, 2019

Honorable Mentions: Right Relationship with Reality, March 2, 2019

Sermon delivered by Pastor Bryan Hackett.

What are Honorable Mentions?  They are the quotes, book references, videos, etc that may have been brought up during Sunday’s sermon and are posted here in case somebody would like to check them out.  Please remember that all references occurred within the context of the sermon.

Prayer:  “My Lord God, I have no idea where I am going. I do not see the road ahead of me. I cannot know for certain where it will end. Nor do I really know myself, and the fact that I think that I am following your will does not mean that I am actually doing so. But I believe that the desire to please you does in fact please you. And I hope I have that desire in all that I am doing. I hope that I will never do anything apart from that desire. And I know that if I do this you will lead me by the right road though I may know nothing about it. Therefore will I trust you always though I may seem to be lost and in the shadow of death. I will not fear, for you are ever with me, and you will never leave me to face my perils alone.”Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude

Bible References:  1 John 4:7-8; Psalm 145:16-17; Book of Joel, chapter 2; Romans 8:18-21

Quotes:

Loving is a way of knowing, and for loving to know, it must personify. Personifying is thus a way of
knowing, especially knowing what is invisible, hidden in the heart.”–James Hillman

“In this perspective personifying is not a lesser, primitive mode of apprehending but a finer one. It presents in psychological theory the attempt to integrate heart into method and to return abstract thoughts and dead matter to their human shapes.” — Thomas Moore, in his book about James Hillman.

“Beloved, let us love one another, for love is from God, and whoever loves has been born of God and knows God. Anyone who does not love does not know God, because God is love.”–John, the mystic disciple of Jesus.

“Finally I am coming to the conclusion that my highest ambition is to be what I already am. That I will never fulfill my obligation to surpass myself unless I first accept myself, and if I accept myself fully in the right way, I will already have surpassed myself.”– Thomas Merton

I am a human being. Nothing human can be alien to me. ”  Maya Angelou, quoting the Roman playwright, Terrence.

Honorable Mentions: I Affirm. February 17, 2019

Honorable Mentions: I Affirm. February 17, 2019

Sermon delivered by Pastor Bryan Hackett.

What are Honorable Mentions?  They are the quotes, book references, videos, etc that may have been brought up during Sunday’s sermon and are posted here in case somebody would like to check them out.  Please remember that all references occurred within the context of the sermon.

Bible references:  Luke 23:42-43; John 5:39-40

Books:  God at War by Greg Boyd (link to the book on Amazon, wE does not profit if you choose to purchase the book, https://www.amazon.com/God-War-Bible-Spiritual-Conflict/dp/0830818855/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=god+at+war&qid=1550854882&s=gateway&sr=8-1).

Readings:  “Seeing Christ Everywhere” by Richard Rohr:  https://cac.org/seeing-christ-everywhere-2019-02-13

Bryan’s Affirmation:  “I believe the Christ is far more universal than our doctrines have allowed, just as Jesus the man was far larger then the doctrines of the Pharisees allowed. All my hope is in the great Christ mystery, which I do not yet understand as I should, nor as I shall. And it is a hope for all things. As Julian of Norwich said over 600 years ago, ‘All will be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.’ I have no inclination to prove or disprove doctrine here [on FB] though. It is a very cold and impersonal place to do so.

Songs:  Johnny Cash, theWanderer https://youtu.be/ACjRCagd0sU